BC & Yukon Resolutions

Resolutions are acted upon once adopted by a vote at the highest level concerned.

If a resolution is forwarded to and accepted by the Provincial Resolutions Committee, passed at Provincial Convention, and directed to the Provincial Government, the Resolution is posted on the CWL Provincial website.

If a resolution is forwarded to and accepted by the Provincial Resolutions Committee, passed at Provincial Convention, and directed to the Federal Government, the resolution is forwarded to the National Resolutions Committee.

If passed by delegates on the National Convention floor, it becomes a League Resolution and is posted on the CWL National website. See link.

All BC/YK Resolutions and related materials are listed.
To write letters see individual resolutions and their action plans.

BC & Yukon Resolutions
2018.03 Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity 123 (SOGI 123)

Whereas, Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity 123 (SOGI 123) violates fundamental rights and freedoms of parents under the guise of promoting equality and respect for diversity; and

Whereas, SOGI 123 exposes vulnerable children to an ideology that may not be supported by their parents; and

Whereas, In 1995, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) ruled: “This [parental] role translates into a protected sphere of parental decision-making which is rooted in the presumption that parents should make important decisions affecting their children; and

Whereas, all children should be safe from discrimination and bullying through available effective anti-bullying programs that do not involve children having to self identify as a gender different from their biological gender; therefore, be it

Resolved, that the BC and Yukon provincial council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada, urge the Provincial Ministry of Education to remove implementation of SOGI 123; and be it further

Resolved, that this resolution be forwarded through the national executive to the other ten provincial councils, encouraging them to become aware of this issue as it pertains to their province/territory, and to act on it, as deemed necessary/prudent.

BRIEF: 2018.03 Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity 123 (SOGI 123)

Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI 123) was developed by the Acceptance, Respect, Capacity Foundation (ARC) in partnership with the Ministry of Education, BC Teachers’ Federation, Out in Schools, UBC Faculty of Education, several school districts in BC, and various levels of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning, Queer organizations (LGBTQQ). It has been mandated for all British Columbia (and Alberta) schools since 2016 (BC Gov News). The program teaches on subjects of gender identity, transgender, gay and lesbian relationships and families. It is taught from Kindergarten to Grade 12 (SOGI 123). This was implemented without the benefit of parents’ knowledge, consent, input or consultation (Culture Guard).

In 1995, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) ruled: “This [parental] role translates into a protected sphere of parental decision-making which is rooted in the presumption that parents should make important decisions affecting their children, both because parents are more likely to appreciate the best interests of their children, and because the state is ill-equipped to make such decisions.” (SCC). SOGI 123 states lesson plans “are meant to be customized by educators as they desire” and that “Teachers are best equipped to determine what is age appropriate for their classrooms.” (SOGI 123 For Parents).

Social Learning Theory states people learn through observing others’ behavior, attitudes, and the consequences of those behaviors. “Most human behavior is learned observationally through modeling…”. Therefore, human behaviour is directed by “continuous reciprocal interaction between cognitive, behavioral, and environmental influences.”(Bandura). SOGI 123, an environmental influence, exposes to children as young as five years of age that a person’s ‘identity’ is what makes a person who they are. Although different interests and activities are discussed, the lesson is focused on “explor[ing] identity, the societal stereotypes often held about gender, how these affect us, and how we can encourage one another to be authentic to our passions and interests.” It also says, “The lesson notes use the term biological sex (which is assigned at birth based on external characteristics) and is sometimes different from gender identity (which is someone’s personal sense of being a girl/woman, a boy/man, or somewhere in between along the gender spectrum.” (SOGI 123 Questioning Gender Expectation). They are saying that a child can “choose” their identity based on how they are feeling and or how they see themselves. However, research has proven that “The fact that children are (with a few exceptions of intersex individuals) born either biologically male or female is beyond debate.” (Mayer) and that, “The understanding of sexual orientation as an innate, biologically fixed property of human beings — the idea that people are “born that way” — is not supported by scientific evidence.” (ibid)

The 1990 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child states that “every child has the right to feel safe at home, at school and in the community” (UN). Bullying is a problem that can affect any child. It is important to note the percentages of LGBTQQ type children are low, and “The majority of children who identify as a gender that does not conform to their biological sex will no longer do so by the time they reach adulthood.” (Mayer). There are many effective anti-bullying programs that have been used in Canada including British Columbia that do not promote gender ideology and undermine parental authority. These include: Walk Away, Ignore, Talk it Out, Seek Help (WITS program); Boomerang; The Fourth R Program; and Edutopia (Eades).

If SOGI 123 continues, parents lose their right to make critical decisions regarding what their children are taught and exposed to. Sexual orientation and gender identity are important moral issues that not everyone agrees on and much of the ideology is not supported by science. Parents are guaranteed the rights of “(a) freedom of conscience and religion; (b) freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression” under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and SOGI 123 violates these rights.

Works Cited: 2018.03 Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity 123 (SOGI 123)

1. ARC Foundation, ARC Foundation Introduces SOGI 123. 2018
http://www.arcfoundation.ca/sogi123/

2. BC Government News Factsheet, Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
https://news.gov.bc.ca/factsheets/sexual-orientation-and-gender-identity-sogi-in-schools

3. Constitution Act 1982, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/Const/page-15.html

4. Culture Guard, Lesson Plan: Questioning Gender Expectations
http://www.cultureguard.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/SOGI-123-2-5-Questioning-Gender- Expectations.pdf

5. Bandura, David L, Social Learning Theory in Learning Theories, June 19, 2015,
https://www.learning-theories.com/social-learning-theory-bandura.html

6. Eades, Michelle, Parents Canada Canadian Bullying Programs That Work July 23, 2012
http://www.parentscanada.com/school/canadian-bullying-programs-that-work

7. Mayer, Lawrence S, M.B., M.S., Ph.D. Sexuality and Gender, Findings from the Biological,
Psychological and Social Sciences. 2016 The New Atlantis – A Journal of Technology and
Science https://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/preface-sexuality-and-gender

8. SOGI 123, For Parents
https://www.sogieducation.org/parents/

9. Supreme Court of Canada, [1995] 1 S.C.R B. (R.) v. Children’s Aid Society of Metropolitan
Toronto
https://scc-csc.lexum.com/scc-csc/scc-csc/en/item/1220/index.do

10. United Nations, Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1990
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/ProfessionalInterest/Pages/CRC.aspx

Action Plan: 2018.03 Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI 123)

1. Write the Provincial Minister of Education requesting that SOGI 123 be removed.

2. Write to local school principals explaining your opposition to SOGI 123.

3. Educate members about SOGI 123 and why it should be removed from the curriculum.

4. Educate parents about SOGI 123 and encourage them to write to their child(ren)’s principals
and the Minister of Education asking that the program be removed.

5. Write to local school board explaining opposition to SOGI 123.

6. Write to local Parent Advisory Council (PAC) and District Parent Advisory Council (DPAC)
explaining opposition to SOGI 123.

Disposition of Resolutions 2008-2017
Year Title Presenting Council  Disposition Notes
2017 Awareness and Resources for the Choice of Psychotherapy for Transgenderism Kamloops Declined by National – was not brought to floor National Committee could not support the possible outcome  of the therapy without the guidance of the Catholic Conference of Bishops
Include Psychotherapy in the British Columbia Medical Services Plan Kamloops Passed at Provincial Educate members and the public on the need for including psychotherapy in the BC Medical Services Plan
Age Verification Mechanisms for Adult Websites Vancouver Passed at National — Changed to Mandatory Age Verification Mechanisms for Adult Pornographic Websites. Encourage members to become educated on internet safety and responsible and appropriate technology use
Protection from Coercion of Health Care Professionals Kamloops Passed at National Educate members and the community on the importance of health care professional’s right of conscience
Repeal Bill C-16 – An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Criminal Code Kamloops Passed at Provincial – Did not go the  floor at National (declined) Educate members on why Bill C-16 should be repealed based on the teachings of the Catholic Church regarding transgender
2016 Physicians Right of Conscience Kamloops Passed at provincial and declined at national – Instead the motion was passed from the national convention floor Motion passed at the 2016 CWL National Convention
Moved
that national council urge provincial councils to petition their provincial/territorial premiers and appropriate ministers  to request that freedom of conscience of healthcare professionals be protected, and to ensure the same protection for healthcare institutions, when either they or individuals within them refuse to participate in medically assisted dying/death or refuse to make direct referrals for patients who request medically assisted dying,
and
that provincial councils petition the provincial/ territorial colleges and/or associations of healthcare professionals urging them to recognize and respect their members’ rights to freedom of conscience.
Legislate and Finance Access to Quality Hospice-Palliative Care for all Canadians Kamloops Passed at provincial and was changed into two resolution from BC & Yukon and National Council (1) Amend the Canada Health Act to Identify Palliative Care as an Insured Health Service & (2) Amend the Canada Health Act to Include Home Care as an Insured Health Service   – See at national website
2015 Invoke the Notwithstanding Clause Victoria Passed at national convention.  Title was changed to:   Invoke Section 33 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the case of Carter vs. Canada See final version and action plan on national website 2015-04
Enduring Power of Attorney on Spouses Kamloops Passed at provincial convention. Provincial council to  urge the provincial government to educate citizens on the importance of EPA and CWL encourage members to establish an EPA.
New Registration Process for Organ and Tissue Donation Vancouver Passed at provincial convention. Provincial council to encourage members to register as organ donors, and to educate others on the importance of organ and tissue donation.
Increased Access to Children and Youth Mental Health Services Kamloops Passed at national convention.  Title was changed to:  Increased Early Intervention and Access to Children and Youth Mental Health Services See final version and action plan on national website 2015.01
Income Tax Credit for Clients of Registered Clinical counsellors Kamloops Passed at Provincial, declined by national Committee felt that the supporting documents did not substantiate that this income tax credit would benefit people and society.
2014 Ban the Addition of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) from Processed Food Kamloops Declined by national Sent to National Education and Health Chairperson for direction.
BC Low-Income Dental Care Kamloops Passed at provincial convention.  Members are asked to encourage MLA’s to support the intent of this resolution.
Federal/Provincial/Territorial  Discussion on Ethical Treatment Re: Assisted Human Reproductive Technology Kamloops Declined by national Was declined as this area of responsibility lies with the provincial and territorial governments.  Resolution has been sent to all provincial presidents and resolution chairpersons for action.
Uninterrupted Services for Disabled Youth to Adult Services Vancouver Passed at provincial convention and directed to Yukon
2013 Live Births from Late-Term Abortions Kamloops Declined by national More proof is required
A Regulatory Framework for Assisted Human Reproductive Technologies Kamloops Declined by national Was declined as it is a provincial issue, however the resolution is asking for federal action.
Protection and Care of Sexually Exploited Children Vancouver Passed at provincial convention and directed to Yukon Was presented to the Provincial Government Feb. 2013
2012 Criminalization of the Purchasing of sexual Services Vancouver Passed at national convention. Title was changed from: Criminalization of the Purchasing of Sex and Protection of Victims of Prostitution See final version 2012.01 and action plan on national website.
Dangers of UV Radiation-Regulation of Tanning Beds Prince George Was withdrawn because the provincial government had proposed regulations under the Public Health Act on this issue to become effective the same year.
Representative at UN for WUCWO Kamloops Declined by national committee
2011 Mandatory Reporting of Deliberate Termination of Pregnancy Kamloops Accepted by national committee with edits. Title changed to Mandatory Reporting of Abortion Statistics Declined at the last minute by national executive due to new information that came to light
Prohibition of Practices RE Human Genetic Material Kamloops Passed at national convention See final version 2011.01 and action plan on national website.
Respect and Protection for Human Embryos and Human Reproductive Material Kamloops Acknowledged by national committee and presented to all 11 provincial councils. See final version 2011.01 and action plan on provincial website.
Safe Haven Law Kamloops Not accepted by national committee as subject falls under provincial jurisdiction. Invitation was sent to parish council to allow them to choose to make edits for presentation next year.  It was also sent to the other provincial councils for study and action as necessary.
2010 Strategies for Alzheimer’s and Related Dementias Nelson  Received for information by national resolutions Will be addressed at provincial level by Education & Health Chairperson
 Exit Strategies for Prostituted Persons Victoria Passed at national convention. Accepted by national committee with edits.  Title changed from Exit Strategies: Offering Hope to Prostituted Persons See final version 2009.01 and action plan on national website
2009 Hate Messages Kamloops Passed at national convention. Accepted by national committee with edits.  Title changed from: Repeal Section 13 of Canadian Human Rights Act RE Hate Messages See final version 2009.03 and action plan on national website
Legislate Penalties to Recognize Unborn Victims of Crime  Not accepted for presentation to the national convention.  Title changed from: Legal Penalties to Recognize Unborn Victims of Crime.  More information was required. New research was done that would significantly change this resolution.  Permission was received to rework this resolution for presentation in 2010.
Protection and Support Services for Foreign Victims of Human Trafficking Kamloops Passed at national convention.  Title changed from: Protection and Support Services for Human Trafficking Victims. See final version 2009.02 and action plan on national website
Regulating the Use of Personal Electronic Devices on School Premises Victoria Passed at provincial convention and directed to the BC & Yukon governments. See final version and action plan on provincial website
Stop Child Executions Kamloops Not accepted for presentation to the national convention – additional research required.
A National Water Policy Nelson Not accepted for provincial convention.  Committee felt issue was not new and did not meet the criteria for acceptance. It is already a League policy raised when the national delegation speaks to the federal government.
2008 Affirming Equal Dignity for all Humankind by Making                                           Prostitution Illegal Not accepted for presentation to the national convention. National felt that this matter was already dealt with in the Criminal Code.
Awareness, Prevention and Treatment of Depression Kamloops The resolved clause does not require action beyond members education and awareness. Information sent directly to the national chairperson of Education and Health for further action.
Ban the Use of Cell Phones While Driving Vancouver Passed at the provincial convention. Directed to the provincial government.
Canadian Broadcast of the “Urbi et Orbi” Vancouver Not accepted for provincial convention.  The brief does not adequately reflect the resolve clause and the brief is primarily spiritually motivated and lacks back up facts suitable for presentation to government The committee recommended that this be forwarded to the spiritual chairpersons to promote action.
Keep Polygamy in the Criminal Code of Canada Vancouver Not accepted by national committee.  They felt that although this topic has been a matter in the headlines recently, asking for a ruling or legislation from the government would be premature. The committee requested the BC & Yukon Council continue to monitor this topic and perhaps re-submit the resolution when relevant legislation has been introduced.
Prevent Human Trafficking at 2010 Olympics Kamloops Passed at national. 2008.01 on national website, along with action plan
Protect Unborn Victims of Crime Kamloops Not accepted by provincial committee.
Protection of Human Trafficking Victims a Priority Kamloops Not accepted by national committee.  The matter is currently being addressed through Bill S218,  An act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act which has passed first and second reading and has been referred to the Human Rights Committee. Should the Bill not proceed and receive Royal assent, the national committee hopes the BC & Yukon Council would re-submit the resolution at that time.
Withdraw Support from Amnesty International Kamloops Not accepted for provincial convention. The provincial resolutions committee suggested the provincial president present the issue to the next national executive meeting for clarification and direction.
2018 Provincial CWL Delegation Meeting with Government Feb 28, 2018

Meeting with Provincial Government February 28, 2018

Delegation: Evelyn Rigby (President), Gisela Montague (President Elect), Blanca Stead (Legislation), Sharon Geiger (Resolutions)

After months of preparation, numerous phone calls and emails to contacts for the government meetings and to the resolution committee, the day finally arrived for our meetings to present our resolutions to members of the BC Legislature on Wednesday, February 28th, 2018.

On Tuesday night, the night before we were to meet with the members of the BC Legislature we went over our speaking notes to prepare ourselves.

On Wednesday morning at 11:00 am we met with six of the NDP caucus and presented recent and past resolutions: we began with presenting the  motion on Enforcement of the protection of communities and exploited persons act., then Coercion of Conscience for Healthcare Professionals, Include Psychotherapy in British Columbia Medical Service Plan, Banning the use of Neonicotinoid Pesticides, National Screening for Newborn Screening including Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, at this time Gisela did a presentation on SOGI 123 and we finished with Hospice Palliative Care An Integral Component of the Canadian Healthcare System.

Members asked questions and also gave us some information. We were well received.

We then went to lunch with Shuswap MLA Greg Kyllo. He told us a bit of his life and how he became an MLA. Todd Stone, MLA for Kamloops also joined us after lunch. MLA Kyllo introduced us to the House – we were in the gallery and attended Question Period. Greg was very excited to have us there because he doesn’t have very many members of his constituency visit him at parliament. After Question Period he met us and gave us a tour and explained many things regarding the building, especially about the Library. He also took us to visit the Speaker of the House who had to have a picture taken with us. After our tour we met with about fifteen members of the Liberal caucus. When we had the picture taken there were only 11 members as some had business to attend to.

The members listened attentively and had some suggestions.

We were well respected by both parties. Greg Kyllo presented us with gifts at the end of our presentation and then picture time. We felt like celebrities because so many photos were taken of us during our time there.

The presentation of our resolutions to government members is an honor and a privilege that we value. The MLAs respect the work that has been done in the preparation of the resolutions and they are attentive and gracious towards our presentation. The interchange of ideas is an education for them and for us and it is very worthwhile.

Respectfully submitted

Sharon Geiger
BC & Yukon Provincial Resolutions Chairperson
BC & Yukon 1st Vice-President

Motion passed at the 2017 BC & Yukon Provincial Convention

In light of Resolution 2012.01 Criminalization of the Purchasing of Sexual Service, and the CWL support of the Protection of the Communities and Exploited Persons Act (Bill C-36):

That members of the BC and Yukon Council of the CWL open a dialogue with local police force to discuss policies and priorities affecting the enforcement of the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act, and to discuss obstacles to enforcement and ways in which the CWL can help to overcome these obstacles, and also to report their findings to their councils and to Diocesan and Provincial Councils.

2017.02 Include Psychotherapy in British Columbia Medical Services Plan

Whereas, psychotherapy is not included in the British Columbia Medical Services Plan; and

Whereas, one in five Canadians experience a mental health issue and;

Whereas, ninety percent of people who complete suicide had a diagnosed mental illness and;

Whereas, Canadians in the lowest income group are 3 to 4 times more likely than those in the highest income group to report poor to fair mental health; therefore be it

Resolved, that the BC and Yukon Provincial Council urge the provincial government to include psychotherapy in the British Columbia Medical Services Plan;

Brief: Include Psychotherapy in British Colombia Medical Services Plan

Many British Columbians experience a need for mental health care, yet all too often these needs are not met through provincial health services. Listed under Services Not Covered by MSP in the British Columbia Medical Services Plan (MSP) are the services of counsellors or psychologists. (BC) Psychologists use the treatment of psychotherapy, which is the “treatment of mental or emotional illness by talking about problems rather than by using medicine or drugs.” (Merriam-Webster) Statistics show that psychotherapy is desperately needed for a vast number of people.

It is estimated that “1 in 5 Canadians are affected annually by mood disorders, anxiety disorders,
schizophrenia, (attention deficit/hyperactive disorders) ADHD, conduct disorders, (oppositional defiant disorders) ODD, substance use disorders or dementia. Not only does mental illness impact individuals but it also places a significant impact on families, communities and the health care system.” (Smetanin) The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health states that, “70% of mental health problems have their onset during adolescence,” And that “People with mental illness and addictions are more likely to die prematurely than the general population.” (CAMH) “Mental illness can cut 10 to 20 years from a person’s life expectancy.” (Chesney) In 2012 almost 4,000 people in Canada died from suicide; this number had remained at a consistent rate for the previous five years. (Canada)

The Canadian Mental Health Association states that, “Studies indicate that more than 90 percent of suicide victims have a diagnosable psychiatric illness, and suicide is the most common cause of death for people with schizophrenia. Both major depression and bipolar disorder account for 15 to 25 percent of all deaths by suicide in patients with severe mood disorders.” (CMHA) “People living with long term health problems like cancer, AIDS, heart disease or Alzheimer disease are more likely to experience depression.” (CMHA) Not being able to afford help for their mental illness creates an even greater hardship, increasing the risk of suicide. Mental illnesses are treatable and suicides can be prevented.

Often people who require psychotherapy are not receiving it because it is not a service provided in the MSP. As a result, these people experience discrimination in society. (OHRC) “Canadians in the lowest income group are 3 to 4 times more likely than those in the highest income group to report poor to fair mental health…Individuals with a mental illness are much less likely to be employed. Unemployment rates are as high as 70% to 90% for people with the most severe mental illnesses.” (CAMH) This results in a downward spiral for their quality of life, as often individuals cannot afford counselling. Mental illness costs the Canadian economy about fifty billion dollars per year, which represents 2.8% of Canada’s 2011 GDP. If the number of people experiencing a mental illness could be reduced in a given year by 10%, after 10 years the economy would be saving at least $4 billion a year. (MHCC) On a smaller scale BC could realize these financial savings by including psychotherapy in the MSP.

Healthcare can be improved within British Columbia. Suicide is prevalent right across our country. With psychotherapy included in the Medical Services Plan, there could be a substantial decrease in the number of suicides completed each year. Without having psychotherapy as part of the MSP services covered, many people with mental disorders are not getting the assistance they need. Psychotherapy needs to be included as part of the Medical Services Plan in BC.

Works Cited: Include Psychotherapy in British Columbia Medical Services Plan

British Columbia, Government of, Medical Health Services Plan (MSP), Services Not Covered by MSP, http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/health/health-drug-coverage/msp/bc-residents/benefits/services-not-covered-by-msp

Canada, Government of, Statistics Canada, Leading causes of death, total population, by age group and sex, Canada http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?lang=eng&id=1020561

Canadian Mental Health Association, Toronto, Suicide Statistics, Canada and Ontario,
http://toronto.cmha.ca/mental_health/suicide statistics/

Canadian Mental Health Association, Victoria Office (BC Division) Get Informed,
http://www.victoria.cmha.bc.ca/get-informed/mental-health-information/mood-disorders

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addictions: Facts and Statistics,http://www.camh.ca/en/hospital/about_camh/newsroom/for_reporters/Pages/addictionmentalhealthstatistics.aspx

Chesney, Goodwin and Fazel (2014). Risks of all-cause and suicide mortality in mental disorders:
a meta-review. World Psychiatry, 13: 153-60 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24890068

Mental Health Commission of Canada, Making the Case for Investing in Mental Health in Canada,http://www.mentalhealthcommission.ca/sites/default/files/2016 06/Investing_in_Mental_Health_FINAL_Version_ENG.pdf

Merriam-Webster, Definition of Psychotherapy https://www.merriamwebster.com/dictionary/psychotherapy

Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions, http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/policy-preventing-discrimination-based-mental-health-disabilities-and-addictions

Smetanin et al. (2011). The life and economic impact of major mental illnesses in Canada:
2011-2041. Prepared for the Mental Health Commission of Canada. Toronto: Risk Analytical
http://www.mentalhealthcommission.ca/sites/default/files/MHCC_Report_Base_Case_FINAL_ENG_0_0.pdf

Action Plan: Include Psychotherapy in British Columbia Medical Services Plan

 Write letters to the British Columbia premier, ministers of health and finance, and local members of legislature, urging the provincial government to invest in citizens by providing access to psychotherapy as part of the medical plan.

 Encourage other provincial/territorial councils of the Catholic Women’s League to determine the support for psychotherapy mental health services in their province/territory medical plan.

 Educate members and the public on the need for including psychotherapy in the BC Medical Services Plan.

 Continue to educate CWL members on Mental Health issues.

2016 Motion for the BC & Yukon provincial rights of conscience resolution passed at the floor of the national convention in Halifax NS

This Resolution was passed at the provincial convention and declined at the national convention – Instead the motion was passed at the national convention floor

Moved

that national council urge provincial councils to petition their provincial/territorial premiers and appropriate ministers to request that freedom of conscience of healthcare professionals be protected, and to ensure the same protection for healthcare institutions, when either they or individuals within them refuse to participate in medically assisted dying/death or refuse to make direct referrals for patients who request medically assisted dying,

and

that provincial councils petition the provincial/territorial colleges and/or associations of healthcare professionals urging them to recognize and respect their members’ rights to freedom of conscience.

Provincial Resolutions Delegation Visit to BC Legislature- Oral Report to Provincial Convention 2016

The BC & Yukon CWL Resolutions delegation, (comprised of CWL President-Elect, Evelyn Rigby, Legislation chairperson Gisela Montague, Education and Health chairperson Agnes Geiger and I, Diane Barker) met with MLAs and representatives of the BC Liberal caucus and the NDP caucus in Victoria on May 3rd and 4th, 2016 to present and discuss CWL resolutions.

Prior to the meetings, 7 resolutions of priority and importance to the League and to our country had been sent in written form to the government representatives.

We were fortunate to have a separate meeting with Environment Minister, Mary Polak, a Roman Catholic, and two of her staff members to discuss the 2015 resolutions relating to the environment: Banning the Use of Neonicotinoid Pesticides and Banning Plastic Microbeads in Personal Care Products. Minister Polak had read Pope Francis’ encyclical Laudato Si and supported the idea of members taking personal responsibility for our environment. The staffers had found, through their research, that the federal government was familiar with these concerns and was moving in the direction of these bans. We encouraged the ministry to not wait for the federal government, but to act quickly. Minister Polak also encouraged us to draw attention to the problem of organic matter being dumped into landfills. This food waste contributes to pollution, waste and greenhouse gasses. The issue of organic matter in landfills might be a good topic for a future CWL resolution.

The initial resolution presented focused on hospice and palliative care. Resolution 2007.03 Hospice Palliative Care: An Integral Component of the Canadian Health Care System affirms the CWL’s opposition to euthanasia and assisted suicide. The imminent passing of Bill C14 by the government makes access to palliative and hospice care even more critical and we emphasized the need for the provincial government to take a leadership role in providing funding for hospice and palliative care throughout our province.

With permission from our national president we also spoke about the need for the BC government to protect the rights of physicians and institutions to freedom of conscience if/when Bill C14 becomes law. We pointed out to them that it appears this decision will be left to provincial governments and we wanted them to ensure these rights were protected.

The other resolutions presented were:

  • Increased Early Intervention and Access to Children and Youth Mental Health Services
  • Enduring Power of Attorney,
  • Registration Process for Organ and Tissue Donation,
    and
  • the 2 Environmental resolutions.

The presentation of the resolutions was well received with pertinent and insightful comments and questions from the MLAs. In response to the Youth Mental Health resolution, we were provided with a copy of the January 2016 Final Report of the Child and Youth Mental Health in British Columbic Concrete Actions for Systemic Change. These reports are available on the BC Government website and I encourage you to take time to read them.

We joined MLA John Martin (Chilliwack) in the Legislative Dining Room for lunch, and then attended the Speaker’s Gallery for Question Period and were introduced to the Legislature by MLA John Martin.

The presentation of our resolutions to government members is an honour and a privilege to be valued. The MLAs respect the resolutions work of the Catholic Women’s League and the exchange of ideas is an education for them and for us, and it is very worthwhile.

Dianne Barker, Resolutions Chairperson

2015.03 New Registration Process for Organ and Tissue Donation

Education and Health

BC & Yukon 2015.03New Registration Process for Organ and Tissue Donation

Whereas, the British Columbia organ and tissue donation registration process has been changed, and

Whereas, there is a chronic shortage of organs and tissue for transplant resulting in hundreds of people waiting for organ transplants, and

Whereas, only 19% of British Columbians are registered to donate; therefore be it

Resolved, that the BC & Yukon Provincial Council of the Catholic Women’s League of Canada encourage members to:

  • register under the new organ donation registration process
  • continue to educate others on the importance of organ and tissue donation.

Carried

Brief: 2015.03 New Registration Process for Organ and Tissue Donation

The driver’s license sticker is no longer a recognized way to register your decision as an organ donor. Now, the only legal record of your decision is made with your Care Card personal health number on the organ donor registry. (Organ Donation Registration Form) Most people do not realize that they still have to register their wishes to donate by filling out an organ donation registration form or registering online at www.transplant.bc.ca, or registering by phone at 604-877-2240, or toll-free at 1-800-663-6189. (David Foster Foundation)

There is a desperate need for organ donation in our province. As of August, 2014, 473 patients in British Columbia were waiting for a suitable organ. Hundreds more are waiting for corneal transplants. Many patients die waiting for a suitable organ. (Organ Transplantation Fact Sheet) The waiting time can be lengthened because some potential donors’ next-of-kin cannot make a quick decision during a crisis situation, or are unaware of the wishes of potential donors at the time of their death.

Donations can take many forms, such as the heart, liver, lungs, pancreas, kidneys, and as well, the heart valves, cornea, tissues, bones, skin, tendons and ligaments can be used. (BC Transplant) One act of love can save many. The new donor registration form outlines the options available for specific donations.

Research shows that Canadians are five to six times more likely to need an organ transplant than they are to become a deceased organ donor. Less than one percent of British Columbians die in a way that would allow them to be a deceased organ donor, so it is important that more people register their wishes. Age is not a factor, as Canada’s oldest organ donor was 90 years old. More than 85% of B.C. residents support organ donation, yet only 19 % have registered their decision. (BC Transplant)

CWL members are encouraged to register for organ and tissue donation with their Care Card personal health number, and to educate others on the importance of registering.

Works Cited: 2015.03 New Registration Process for Organ and Tissue Donations

1. BC Transplant
http://www.transplant.bc.ca

2. David Foster Foundation
http://www.davidfosterfoundation.com

3. Organ Donor Registration Form

4. Resolution 1995.03 Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness

Resolution 1995.03: Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness

Action Plan:

1. Obtain organ donation registration forms from BC Transplant office.
2. Show the power point presentation that is available for use.
3. Promote organ and tissue donation to the membership.
4. Promote annual organ donation awareness week.
5. Contact BC Transplant at West Tower, 555 – 12th Ave. Floor 3, Vancouver BC V5Z 9Z9 or visit www.transplant.bc.ca

2015.02 Enduring Power of Attorney on Spouses

BC & Yukon 2015.02 Enduring Power of Attorney on Spouses

Whereas, Power of Attorney ends when a spouse becomes mentally incapacitated, and Enduring Power of Attorney is in effect regardless of mental capability; and

Whereas, many couples have their assets in both names and incorrectly assume that they have Enduring Power of Attorney; and

Whereas, in case of accident or illness where one spouse becomes incapacitated, an Enduring Power of Attorney allows the other spouse to make decisions regarding the management of assets; therefore be it

Resolved, that the BC & Yukon Provincial Council of the Catholic Women’s League of Canada urge the provincial government to educate the citizens of British Columbia on the importance of Enduring Power of Attorney; and be it further

Resolved, that the BC & Yukon Provincial Council of the Catholic Women’s League of Canada educate members on the importance of Enduring Power of Attorney and encourage them to establish an Enduring Power of Attorney to cover financial and legal matters.
BRIEF – 2015.02 Enduring Power of Attorney on Spouses

The Enduring Power of Attorney (EPA) is a legal document under the Power of Attorney Act of British Columbia. (Quickscribe)

The key difference between Power of Attorney (POA) and EPA is that POA is a document that appoints another person to make financial and legal decisions. An Enduring Power of Attorneyallows someone to continue to make financial and legal decisions for you even if you become mentally incapacitated. (Clicklaw)

It is important to make an EPA before a crisis happens. Once a person is not able to recall or understand what she/he owns, she/he is considered incapable of making an EPA. (Nidus) Owning real estate or a motor vehicle jointly with your spouse or anyone else is an estate planning tool for when an owner dies. It does not apply if an owner becomes incapacitated. (ibid)

“As an adult, no one, not even a spouse, has legal authority over your financial or legal affairs. If you do not have an Enduring Power of Attorney when you lose your mental capacity to manage your own affairs, then the Public Trustee takes over your affairs until someone else is appointed by the courts.” (Yih) A lawyer or notary public is recommended to prepare and review your EPA. (Nidus)

Some people have a Power of Attorney and think they have their assets looked after. Many do not know that “POA is in effect only when you are mentally capable; it immediately ends when you become mentally incapable.”(ibid) Catholic Women’s League members need to be encouraged to establish an Enduring Power of Attorney to cover their financial and legal matters if incapacitated.
WORKS CITED 2015.02 Enduring Power of Attorney on Spouses

Clicklaw, Should I have an Enduring Power of Attorney or a Representation Agreement? (2015). Retrieved April 16, 2015, from http://www.clicklaw.bc.ca/question/commonquestion/1005

Nidus, Enduring Power of Attorney: Planning for Financial and Legal Affairs. (2012, March). Retrieved April 16, 2015, from http://www.nidus.ca/PDFs/Nidus_FactSheet_EPA.pdf

Nidus, Power of Attorney or Enduring Power of Attorney? Which one do I make?(2012, June). Retrieved April 13, 2015, from http://www.nidus.ca/PDFs/Nidus_FactSheet_EPA.pdf

Nidus, What about the forms? (2115) Retrieved April 16, 2015, from http://www.nidus.ca/?page_id=218

Quickscribe, Power of Attorney Act. (2011, August 31). Retrieved April 13, 2015, from http://www.quickscribe.bc.ca/secure/archives/4592.pdf

Yih, J. (2015) Power of Attorney helps other make financial decisions when you can’t. Retrieved April 13, 2015, from http://retirehappy.ca/power-of-attorney-helps-other-make-financial-decisions-when-you-can

ACTION PLAN

Write to MLA and Provincial Ministers of Justice and Health urging them to educate the citizens of BC on the importance of Enduring Power of Attorney.

Councils initiate education and promote awareness regarding Enduring Power of Attorney through workshops or seminars.

Invite a guest speaker.

2014.02 British Columbia Low-Income Dental Care

Health and Education
BC & Yukon Provincial Council

BC 2014.02 BRITISH COLUMBIA LOW-INCOME DENTAL CARE

WHEREAS, The citizens of British Columbia with low income have a disproportionately high level of dental concerns, and

WHEREAS, There are numerous health and social benefits from good oral health care, and

WHEREAS, Government dental funding for low income citizens exists, yet this funding does not sufficiently enable access therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That the members of the BC & Yukon Council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada urge the BC Government to provide fully subsidized basic dental care for low income citizens.

BC 2014.02 Brief: British Columbia Low-Income Dental Care

Low-income citizens need basic dental care. For the purpose of this resolution, basic dental care is defined as cleanings, x-rays, fillings, extractions and dentures, and the procedures needed to provide them.

The Canadian Health Measures Survey, released by Health Canada, confirms that poverty is significantly associated with poor oral health, untreated disease, fewer visits to a dentist, as well as avoiding and refusing subsequent visits and care due to cost. (Quinonez) The Canadian Dental Association (CDA) recommends that infants and toddlers visit the dentist within their first year in order to identify and address early signs of tooth decay, promote oral hygiene and lifelong health. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)’s recent investigation of hospital day surgeries, for children age one to five, report that early childhood cavities are the major cause, costing $22 million per year in hospitalization costs alone. (CDA 2013) The groups within the minority without adequate care include: seniors, low-income populations, people with special needs, children and Aboriginal peoples. (CDA, 2010) Loss of work or school days due to dental problems and the related loss in education and income are significant, especially if the poor are unduly represented: 2 million school days and 4 million working days are lost annually. (CCPA)

Oral health is defined by the CDA as “a state of the oral (mouth) and related tissues and structures that contribute positively to physical, mental and social well-being and the enjoyment of life’s possibilities, by allowing the individual to speak, eat and socialize unhindered by pain, discomfort or embarrassment.” Dental cavities are a preventable chronic disease. All Canadians must have the right to good oral health. (CDA 2010) Currently, research is showing an increased incidence of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, pneumonia and Alzheimer’s amongst those with poor oral health. If the government ignores oral health, it will pay a much higher price in the future. (CCPA) Dr. W. H. (Holly) Schwieger of the New Life Mission Clinic in Kamloops attests that people who have turned their lives around after years of drug addictions, may need dental work done before being able to fully re-integrate into society. Funding for dental clinics that cater to marginalized persons needs to be part of the access to service of dental insurance for low income citizens. (Wallace)

The continued discrepancy between government dental fees for services and the private practice dentistry’s fee guide has caused considerable limitation of public dental benefits. With dentists unwilling to treat patients at the rates provided by publicly funded programs, these policies have limited impact on improving access to care. (CDA 2010). Since 2007 there have been calls to remove barriers to dental care, to expand prescription and dental insurance to low income children and parents, seniors and special needs persons, and to address the disparity between the BC Government Dental Fee Guide and the BC Dentists’ fees. (Wallace) CDA recommends developing paths of access for the minority who do not have care: partnerships between dental professionals, other health professionals, federal and provincial governments, provincial and municipal dental public health programs and non-government community agencies. CDA also recommends a collaborative approach to address equitable access to dental care, incorporating oral health care as an integral part of general health care. (CDA 2010) Of the $12.6 billion spent on dental services in Canada in 2009, only 5% was publicly funded. Governments can improve access to preventive and early treatment care for children and youth as well as building on programs for social assistance recipients, and adults who are ‘working poor’ with no ability to pursue dental treatment. Improving public dental benefits may encourage more dentists to participate in the service. For the health of the citizens of our province, we ask the BC government to provide fully subsidized basic dental care.

Works Cited

“Access to Oral Health Care for Canadians.” Canadian Dental Association. May 2010. Web. 11 November 2013. http://www.cda-adc.ca/_files/position_statements/accessToCare.pdf

“CDA Position Statements” Canadian Dental Association. n.p. n.d. Web. 11November 2013
http://www.cda-adc.ca/en/cda/media_room/position_statements/

“Community Roots.” The Mastermind Studios Mastermind Studios 2013. Web. March 18, 2014. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i09Ko6K6MZs

“Putting Our Money Where Our Mouth Is: The Future of Dental Care in Canada.”Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) April 2011. Web. 11 November 2013.

http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2011/04/Putting%20our%20money%20where%20our%20mouth%20is.pdf

Quinonez, Carlos R. “Denticare, Denticaid and the Dental Insurance Industry” April 2011. Web. 11 November 2013 http://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2011/04/Putting%20our%20money%20where%20our%20mouth%20is.pdf

“Visit to Dentist within Baby’s First Year Key to Preventing Childhood Caries.”Canadian Dental Association. N.p., May 4, 2004. Web. 11 Nov. 2013 http://www.cda-adc.ca/en/cda/media_room/news_releases/2013/101713.asp

Wallace, Bruce. “Access to dental Care for Low-Income Residents of Campbell River and Comox Valley,” 2010. Web. 27 January 2014
https://coolaid.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Dental_Research_North_Island_Access.pdf

Action Plan

  • Invite a speaker from Public Health or a low-income dental clinic in your community to address your council.
  • Celebrate Dental Month in April.
  • Write letters to: Premier; Minister of Health; Minister of Family and Child Development; Minister of Technology, Innovation and Citizen’s Services with copies to your local member of the legislature, urging the provincial government to provide fully subsidized basic dental care for low-income citizens.
  • Educate members of the ongoing research regarding the need for good oral health.
  • Monitor the government’s response to the request contained in the resolution.
2013.01 Uninterrupted Services for Disabled Youth to Adult Services

Whereas, When disabled youth reach the age of 19 they are no longer eligible to receive services from the Ministry of Children and Family Development, and
Whereas, For continuation of support programs designed to enhance life skills, create social connections, and encourage community involvement, disabled youth are placed on a request for services list through Community Living BC, and
Whereas, Canada has signed the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, therefore be it
Resolved, That the BC & Yukon Provincial Council of the Catholic Women’s League of Canada in 66th annual convention assembled strongly urge the Government of British Columbia to automatically transfer without interruption, all existing services provided by the Ministry of Children and Family Development to Community Living BC when disabled youth reach the age of 19.

BRIEF: Resolution 2013.01 Uninterrupted Services for Disabled Youth to Adult Services
The Ministry of Children and Family Development recognizes and values children with special needs and does recognize that support and full participation in community life is important. Therefore they provide services and supports in partnership with the Ministries of Health and Education, and regional and community agencies throughout the province until the age of 19. (Ministry of Children and Family Development, Children and Youth with Special Needs).

When disabled youth reach the age of 19, they are transferred from the Ministry of Children and Family Development to Community Living BC and are not automatically guaranteed continuation of their existing services and supports and may be put on a request for services waitlist. (Hansard). Support may consist of additional educational, medical/health and social/environmental support. (Ministry of Children and Family Development, Children and Youth with Special Needs).

Co-led by the Ministry of Housing and Social Development, Ministry of Children and Family Development and Community Living BC, the province of British Columbia established the “Cross Ministry Transition Planning Protocol for Youth with Special Needs”, in November, 2009 to help transition disabled youth and their families into adult services (Ministry of Children & Family Development 2009).

Community Living BC, a provincial crown agency mandated under the Community Living Authority Act,
and the responsibility of the Ministry of Social Development (Community Living BC) delivers supports
and services to adults with developmental disabilities and their families in British Columbia (Community Living BC Aug. 2011). In BC approximately 600 youth with developmental disabilities turn 19 each year; (Community Living BC 2012). “…Community Living BC itself has not been able to match the level of services many families receive from the children’s service system.” (Community Living BC Nov. 2011).
In a unique historic moment Canada was one of the first countries to originally sign the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which recommends that “Persons with disabilities have access to a range of in-home, residential and other community support services, including personal assistance necessary to support living and inclusion in the community, and to prevent isolation or segregation from the community;” (United Nations). It was supported by all the provinces and territories. (Government of Canada).
Successful transition of existing services is achievable. Currently disabled children who require specialized medical equipment and supplies and who are supported by the Ministry of Children and Family Development’s At Home Program are successfully transitioned without interruption to the Ministry of Social Development and Health on the last day of the month of the youth’s 18th birthday. (Ministry of Children and Family Development 2010). Therefore, we urge the government to ensure that ALL existing services being provided to disabled youth continue to be provided once they reach adulthood, in keeping with Canada’s support of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

WORKS CITED:

Community Living B.C.
http://www.communitylivingbc.ca/about/overview/
http://www.communitylivingbc.ca/about/governance
http://communitylivingbc.ca/wp-content/uploads/CLBC_Requests_for _Service.pdf

Government of British Columbia, Children and Youth with Special Needs, Transitioning, into Adulthood,
Cross Ministry Transition Planning Protocol for Youth with Special Needs (page 5).
http://www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/spec_needs/pdf/transition_planning_protocol.pdf

Government of British Columbia, Children and Youth with Special Needs, Transitioning, into Adulthood, Questions and answers (page 2)
http://www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/spec_needs/pdf/qa_ytpp.pdf

Government of Canada, Canada News Centre, Canada Ratifies UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, March 11, 2010.
http://news.gc.ca/web/article-eng.do?nid=517849
Hansard: 2011 Legislative Session: Third Session, 39th Parliament http://www.leg.bc.ca/hansard/39th3rd/h10518p.htm#7159
http://www.leg.bc.ca/cmt/39thparl/session-4/fgs/hansard/N1014am-57.pdf
Ministry of Children and Family At Home Program (page 4)
http://www.mcf.bc.ca/at_home/pdf/ahp_guide.pdf
Ministry of Children & Family Development, Children and Youth with Special Needs.
http://www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/spe_needs/indew.hm

Ministry of Housing and Social Development , disability strategy
http://www.hsd.gov.bc.ca/disability_strategy.htm
Ministry of Social Development, Community Living Interim report Nov 2011(page 6)
http://www.sd.gov.bc.ca/pwd/docs/clbc-interim-report.pdf
Ministry of Social Development, Deputy Minister Report – December 2011(pages 16-18)
http://www.sd.gov.bc.ca/pwd/docs/Improving_Services_to_People_with_Developmental_Disabilities_Report_FINAL.pdf
Newswire, search-Community Living Action Group
http://www.newswire.ca
United Nations
http://www.un.org/disabilities/documents/convention/convoptprot-e.pdf

ACTION PLAN:

  • Write letters to the premier, minister of Housing and Social Development, minister of Finance, with copies to your local member of parliament urging the provincial government to provide uninterrupted services for disabled Youth transitioning to Adult Services.
  • Educate members on the challenges of disabled youth and their families when transitioning to Adult Services.
  • Support local disabled transitioning youth and their families in the transitioning process.
  • Become a member of the local Association for Community Living.
    quest contained in the resolution.
2012.01 Protection and Care of Sexually Exploited Children

RESOLUTION BC 2012.01

Community Life
BC & Yukon Provincial Council
BC 2012.01 Protection and Care of Sexually Exploited Children
Whereas child-appropriate detoxification and counselling services and independent, supportive housing options do not exist in British Columbia for sexually exploited children, and
Whereas the vast majority of sexually exploited children are drug and/or alcohol addicted, and
Whereas the government and the people of British Columbia are legally responsible for the protection and care of sexually exploited children, therefore, be it
Resolved that the BC & Yukon Provincial Council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada urge the Government of British Columbia to provide a safe, supportive residence that:
a) is specifically designed for sexually exploited children, and
b) provides a continuum of integrated services that includes child appropriate detoxification, counseling and stabilization.
Community Life
BC & Yukon Provincial Council
BRIEF:
2012.01 Protection and Care of Sexually Exploited Children
In British Columbia there are no child appropriate detoxification and counseling services and few, if any, independent, supportive housing options for sexually exploited children. Those under 16 years of age fall under the auspice of Social Welfare and foster care (Child Family and Community Services Act Part 1, Part 2.1, 12.1). Those over 16 years of age have access to adult services.
The British Columbia Child Protection Act (Child Family & Community Services Act Part 1 Guiding Principles 2) states “This Act must be interpreted and administered so that the safety and well-being of children are the paramount considerations and in accordance with the following principles: a) children are entitled to be protected from abuse, neglect and harm or threat of harm;…”
The Act (Child Family & Community Services Act Part 3, Div. 1-13) also states in part that a child needs protection if:
• a child has been sexually exploited
• a child is deprived of necessary health care
• and/or a child is emotionally harmed
While most street youth do not become involved in prostitution, the great majority of those who do are far more likely to become active substance abusers. (Sexual Exploitation of Youth in British Columbia Section III.12)
Sexual exploitation occurs when children trade sexual activities for money, drugs, gifts, food, services or anything similar. The average age children are first exploited is between 13 and 15 years of age. Up to 1 in 3 reported first being sexually exploited before age 14. (It’s Not What You Think-UBC School of Nursing Study p. 12 & p. 22)
Studies commissioned by the British Columbia government (BC Government Asst. Deputy Minister Report: Sexual Exploitation of Youth in BC 11.8 & 11.9) clearly illustrate that our Province lacks the necessary services as described below:
a) Detoxification and treatment beds specifically for youth
One of the biggest gaps in services is access to alcohol and drug detoxification, treatment and counseling specific to children. Children currently placed in detoxification are often re-victimized by adult males.
b) Mental health services
Many of these children have serious mental health issues that are undiagnosed.
c) Safe, supportive, residential environment specifically designed for sexually exploited children.
Foster care does not work for these children. They need independent living with support and supervision in which to receive a continuum of care.
There is no clear exit route for these children. Service providers need to be able to provide an integrated continuum of services that include child-appropriate detoxification, counseling and stabilization within a safe environment (Senate Committee on Human Rights Study: The Sexual Exploitation of Children in Canada: the Need for National Action p. 60)
The Government of British Columbia as our representative has the responsibility to protect and care for children, especially the most vulnerable. We urge the Government of British Columbia to take immediate action to provide protection and the necessary care as indicated herein for the sexually exploited children of this Province.
RESOURCES:
2012.01 Protection and Care of Sexually Exploited Children
Child, Family, and Community Service Act (pdf) (RSBC 1996) Chapter 46
www.bclaws.ca/Recon/document/ID/freeside/00_96046_01
Assistant Deputy Ministers’ Committee Report on Prostitution and the Sexual Exploitation of Youth in British Columbia
www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/youth/pdf/sex_exploit.pdf
It’s Not What You Think: Sexually Exploited Youth in British Columbia
University of BC School of Nursing Report
www.nursing.ubc.ca/pdfs/ItsNotWhatYouThink.pdf
Sexual Exploitation of Children in Canada: the Need for National Action
Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights -The Hon. Mobina Jaffer, Chair
www.parl.gc.ca-Content-SEN/Committee/411/ridr/rep/rep03nov11-e.pdf
ACTION PLAN:
1. Write letters, send Emails, or phone your local MLA to support this resolution.
Note:
All the backup material pertains to the province of BC, however, we encourage Yukon members to research what is provided by their territorial government in order to act on this resolution.

2011.02 Respect and Protection for Human Embryos and Human Reproductive Material

RESOLUTION BC 2011.02

BC Respect and Protection for Human Embryos and Human Reproductive Material

Whereas, provincial and territorial governments now need statutes and/or regulations for the handling of human embryos, reproductive material, and licensing due to the Supreme Court of Canada Decision (Dec. 2010) which deemed sections of the Assisted Human Reproduction Act (2004) as unconstitutional and under provincial jurisdiction; and
Whereas, the lack of statutes and regulations could lead to the mishandling of human reproductive material and the abuse of human embryos which deserve respect and protection; therefore be it
Resolved, that the BC & Yukon Council of the Catholic Women’s League of Canada urge the BC and Yukon governments to implement regulations that would provide protection and respectful standards in the handling of human embryos, and regulations on the handling of human reproductive material, and licensing.
BRIEF: BC2011.02 Respect and Protection for Human Embryos and Human Reproductive Material

The Supreme Court of Canada (Dec. 2010) ruled on the constitutional challenge by the Quebec government regarding The Assisted Human Reproduction Act (2004) (the Act). The ruling deemed Sections 10, 11, 13, 14 to 18, 40(2)(3)(3.1)(4)(5) and 44(2)(3) as exceeding legislative authority of Parliament thus agreeing these were under provincial jurisdiction. (McLachlin et all) Due to the Supreme Court ruling, provinces and territories that lack statutes or regulations now need them for the handling of human embryos, reproductive material and licensing.
Since human embryos are total, unique human beings that only need time for complete development, they deserve respectful handling and protection. As well, reproductive material must not be treated as commodities but require regulations and licensing. The Act defines human reproductive material as “a sperm, ovum or other human cell or a human gene, and includes a part of any of them.” (the Act, section 3) . Since these sections of the Act are now deemed to be under provincial jurisdiction, the lack of statutes and/or regulations could lead to abuses of human embryos and human reproductive material which could include exporting, importing, research and destruction. (section 10, 11, 13, 14, 16(3), 18, 40(2)(3)(3.1)).
We urge the BC and Yukon governments to implement regulations immediately that would provide protection and respectful standards in the handling of human embryos, and regulations for the handling of reproductive material as well as all the licensing required. Through our National Council we ask that all Provincial Councils bring this to their own provincial and territorial governments asking that immediate efforts be made by these governments to meet and develop consistent and respectful regulations throughout the country in regards to the handling of human embryos, reproductive material and licensing.
Our society has a responsibility to take immediate action. To quote His Grace Archbishop Richard Smith, “We’re talking about a fundamental question of life itself and dignity of human life, this is a consideration that transcends provincial and national boundaries.” (Gyapong)
REFERENCES: BC2011.02 Respect and Protection for Human Embryos and Human Reproductive Material

 Assisted Human Reproduction Act 2004
 Gyapong, Deborah, Supreme Court ruling casts out genetic research barriers, Western Catholic Reporter, January 17th, 2011
 McLachlin C.J. and Binnie, LeBel, Deschamps, Fish, Abella, Charron, Rothstein and Cromwell JJ. Supreme Court of Canada Decision re Assisted Human Reproduction Act 2004

ACTION PLAN:

All members write letters to their governments:
Asking them to implement regulations to protect human embryos and to develop respectful standards for the handling of human reproductive material and all licensing required;
Asking them to convene consultative meetings with their provincial counterparts to develop consistent and respectful national regulations in the handling of human embryos, reproductive material and all the licensing required.
Send copies of letters to your MLA and MP.
rder to act on this resolution.